Orchids at Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens is the heart of the botanical world.  It’s one of the oldest, largest, and most important botanical gardens, and it maintains the largest collection of living plants on earth. Kew is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it’s also one of London’s top tourist attractions. And, of course, it has lots of great orchids. Dave and I visited Kew Gardens at the end of June, and were astonished by all its botanical beauty. I’m just starting to sort through our photos. Here are my first orchid shots from Kew Gardens.

Vanda orchid, yellow flower with dark red spots, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UKCatasetum orchid, light yellow and red flowers, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UKPhragmipedium orchid, red and yellow Lady Slipper flower, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UK

We found lots of orchids in Kew’s remarkable Princess of Wales Conservatory, and a few more in the majestic Palm House. The Princess of Wales Conservatory has zones for both tropical and temperate growers. The blooming orchids feature rare species, including some which Kew has brought back from the brink of extinction.

Paphiopedilum orchid, pink yellow and green Lady Slipper flower, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UKPhalaenopsis orchid, white yellow and red Moth Orchid flowers covered with dew, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UKBrassia orchid, orange red and white orchid flowers, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UK

Dating to 1769, Kew covers 300 acres (121 hectares) with gardens, glasshouses, statues, and historic buildings, including the royal Kew Palace. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew has been at the forefront of plant conservation and research for more than two centuries. It maintains one of the largest botanical libraries, and one of the largest collections of dried plant specimens, in the world. Continuing an effort begun by Charles Darwin to register all plant names, Kew publishes the International Plant Names Index, as well as the Plant List. There’s so much more to this incredible institution — check back soon to see more pictures from Kew.

Oncidium hybrid orchid, orange red and white orchid flowers, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UKDendrobium victoria-reginae, purple and white orchid flowers, orchid species, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UKCoelogyne pulverula orchid species, purple white and reddish-brown flowers, orchid species, dozens of flowers hanging down, Princess of Wales Conservatory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, London, UK

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8 Comments on “Orchids at Kew Gardens”

  1. charlotteperes Says:

    Wow! Great article and pics! Thank you so much!!

  2. Ernesto2239 Says:

    Wonderful shots esp that first yellow orchid! Thanks for sharing.

  3. AboutOrchids » Blog Archive » More Orchids From Kew Gardens Says:

    […] More Orchids From Kew Gardens […]

  4. mark98s Says:

    KEW! I visited before and I love it! I want to go back! Oh, what great pics

  5. AboutOrchids » Blog Archive » Exploring the Palm House at Kew Gardens Says:

    […] First opened in 1848, this glasshouse stands as an icon of Kew Gardens. […]

  6. Sanjey Malhotra Says:

    Love your photography! I will be a frequent visitor for a really long time.

  7. AboutOrchids » Blog Archive » The Princess of Wales Conservatory Says:

    […] The Princess of Wales Conservatory is one of Kew Gardens’ greatest treasures.[…]

  8. AboutOrchids » Blog Archive » Unusual Orchids At Kew Gardens Says:

    […] These photos from our recent trip to Kew Gardens highlight the depth of their esteemed orchid collection. […]